Rabbi's Message - July 2022 - Praying For Others

The question I often hear these days

when I speak to people is, how do we

keep our world intact when it feels as if

everything we’ve known is falling

apart? Finding ourselves anxious and

confused about all the unrest and illness

can bring us to a place of sadness. There is uncertainty

mixed with grief. We worry about our future, our children’s

future. We worry about our country. During all the

chaos we have the power to bring light.


King David says it best in his book of Tehillim, the book

of Psalms: “The world is built through kindness.” When the

universe around us is falling down, we have the ability to

raise it up. Compassion becomes a mighty force of

strength that transforms sorrow into joy. Every time we

connect with another soul, we create a link of unity. Hope

for the future is born. We are all feeling vulnerable these

days. Connecting with others unlocks the constraints we

are enduring. Knowing that we have/had parents, friends

and family who love us, care for us, and watch over us,

empowers us as we struggle with the darkness. We all

have the ability to reconnect with someone now and create

a moment of kindness.


Sefer Chasidim, a 13th century work of teachings,

explains that prayer was instituted in this way because

G-d only listens to the requests of those who are also conscious

of their fellows’ needs. So, my friends, no matter

whether we are praying alone or in community, we are

prompted to think about the whole of humanity when we

pray, not only of ourselves. Because the whole is greater

than the sum of its parts, we pray in this way no matter

where we are physically — both to improve the receptiveness

of our prayers and, perhaps, to deepen our empathy

for others. Even when we do not sit in the same room or

walk in another person’s shoes, still we pray for them.


Let us all continue in our davening, our prayers each

day, for those who are not in the best of health for a refuah

shelaimah, a full and complete healing. May it come swiftly

and soon and let us say, amen!


If anyone knows of someone who is ill or has

passed or is in some other need please call or

email me directly so that I can make contact with

them. My number is 305-338-3029 and my email is


DSchonblum@yahoo.com


Rabbi Schonblum

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